Frequently Asked Questions about
VENTAVIS® (iloprost) Inhalation Solution

Getting started

How long will I be on VENTAVIS?

PAH is a chronic disease, and the medicines that treat PAH are generally meant to be taken every day for the long term. Talk with your doctors about how VENTAVIS fits into their treatment plan for you. Until there's a cure, taking the treatment prescribed by your doctor is an important way to help you manage your disease. In a clinical study, VENTAVIS was shown to help some patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III and IV PAH (WHO Group 1) improve a combination of 3 different clinical measurements, which included an improvement in PAH symptoms (functional class), walking farther in a timed test, and decreasing the worsening of PAH. About 5 times as many patients taking VENTAVIS had clinical improvement compared to those who took placebo (19% vs. 4%).1 Every person responds differently to therapy, so it's important to let your doctor know how you feel when you visit him/her. Remember that in chronic diseases like PAH it is important to follow the directions of your healthcare team. They want you to do your best to reach your treatment goals.

When will I start feeling better?

You shouldn't expect to feel better overnight; you and your doctor should work together to set a reasonable goal. Some people may want to walk around the block. Others may want to attend their child's soccer match. Choose something that's meaningful and realistic for you, and then keep track of how you are doing. Having a goal can be an important part of your treatment plan. It's important to remember that each person responds differently to therapy and some patients may not respond to specific therapies. It can sometimes take months to respond to treatment, so it's important to try to keep a positive attitude.

What happens after my doctor writes a prescription for VENTAVIS?

Once you and your doctor decide that VENTAVIS is the right treatment for you, your healthcare team sends the VENTAVIS prescription to Actelion Pathways®, Actelion's service and support program. Actelion Pathways Case Managers will work with your insurance company to select a specialty pharmacy for you. VENTAVIS is not available at your neighborhood pharmacy, so a specialty pharmacy works with you to train you on the I-neb® Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD®) System—the device used to take VENTAVIS—and send you shipments of VENTAVIS. An Actelion Pathways nurse will also call you to see if you have any questions about VENTAVIS or the I-neb AAD.

If you ever have questions, Actelion Pathways gives you a single point of contact for access to VENTAVIS, reimbursement support, information about financial assistance programs, and information about taking VENTAVIS. Call 1-866-ACTELION (1-866-228-3546) or visit Actelion Pathways to learn more.

What if I can't afford my therapy?

Paying for therapy is a concern for many people. VENTAVIS is paid for by many different health insurance plans. Actelion Pathways and your specialty pharmacy will work with your insurance company to get VENTAVIS for you. If you don't have health insurance, Actelion—the maker of VENTAVIS—may be able to help. Actelion Pathways, Actelion's service and support program, has financial assistance available to help eligible patients pay for their therapy. Visit Actelion Pathways or call 1-866-ACTELION (1-866-228-3546) to learn more.

How much time do the treatments take each day?

The I-neb AAD is the small portable device used to take VENTAVIS. The I-neb AAD is designed to work with you and adjust to how you breathe to make sure you get the right dose. Because everyone breathes differently, individual treatment times will vary and should take between 4 to 10 minutes per treatment. VENTAVIS is approved for use 6 to 9 times daily.1 Your doctor will let you know how many times to use it each day. If you have longer treatment times, learning about the ABCs of VENTAVIS (Angle, Breathing, and Cleaning) can help you manage your treatment time to keep them as short as possible while still giving you the right dose.

Your doctor may prescribe VENTAVIS 20 mcg/mL if you have long treatment times and are maintained at the 5 mcg dose. The higher concentration of medicine lowers the amount of solution you need to take by 50%, which gives you shorter treatment time.1

How much time will I spend on cleaning?

VENTAVIS has convenient once-a-day cleaning. You can clean your I-neb AAD parts and the chamber (mesh) lids at the end of the day after completing all of your treatments. This should take about 5 minutes. Once a week you boil the parts and chamber lids for 6 to 10 minutes. Visit the I-neb learning center to learn more about once-a-day cleaning of the I-neb AAD parts used to take VENTAVIS.

I have a busy schedule. How can I fit VENTAVIS into my life?

Many find that the I-neb AAD's portability makes it convenient to fit VENTAVIS into their busy schedules. Because the I-neb AAD is small and lightweight, you can take your treatments almost anywhere at anytime. Some people take treatments while parked in a car, at the office, at a mall, and other places when they are away from home. Take VENTAVIS as directed by your doctor, but no more often than once every two hours.

I live in a small apartment. Will I have enough room for the equipment?

Chances are that you will have plenty of space because VENTAVIS doesn't require a large amount of equipment. The I-neb AAD, charging dock, distilled water, and bowls for cleaning are the main items you need. You should be able to store your medication and equipment in a kitchen cabinet or a small tote bag—your medication needs to be stored in a clean dry place away from extreme temperatures.

Where can I find distilled water?

Most supermarkets and drugstores carry distilled water. Look in the bottled-water aisle.

It's important to use only distilled water for your daily cleaning and once-weekly boil. Normal tap water has minerals in it that can clog the tiny holes in the chamber (mesh) lids. Keeping the meshes clear of minerals is key to maintaining the I-neb AAD delivery system and to helping you get the most out of your VENTAVIS treatments. Be sure you purchase distilled water and not spring water. Spring water can still have minerals in it, while distilled water has had all the minerals removed.

Many supermarkets also offer delivery services, so you don't have to worry about getting the distilled water to your house. Check with your local supermarket to see if this service is available.

Taking treatments

How am I supposed to breathe in this treatment if I have trouble breathing on my own?

The I-neb AAD is designed to work with you and adjust to how you breathe. Because VENTAVIS is an inhaled PAH therapy, it goes to the lungs—the site of disease for people with PAH. When taking your treatments, try your best to breathe normally in a slow and steady manner. Try counting one-one thousand, two-one thousand, three-one thousand each time you breathe in. Talk with your doctor if you have problems breathing properly while taking treatments. Your healthcare team can show you tools that will let you know the best way for you to breathe when taking VENTAVIS.

I'm not a technical person. Will I be able to handle using the I-neb AAD?

You don't have to be a technical person to take VENTAVIS with the I-neb AAD. It's designed to be easy to use, it adapts to the way you breathe, and it's fully portable, so you can take it with you when you leave the house. Before starting VENTAVIS everyone receives training from nurses or respiratory therapists on how to use the I-neb AAD. Keep a positive attitude and you can get the hang of it. If you have any questions about the I-neb AAD, you can call Actelion Pathways at 1-866-ACTELION (1-866-228-3546), contact your specialty pharmacy, or learn more on this website at the I-neb Learning Center.

What do I do if I have to take a treatment when I'm away from the house?

You don't have to be at home to take your treatments. When fully charged, the I-neb AAD battery will last for up to 40 treatments, so you don't need to stay at home. Because the I-neb AAD is small and portable, many people take treatments in places such as parks, while on the train, or even at the mall. Be sure to plan ahead and bring everything with you when you leave the house so you won't miss a treatment.

Can I take my treatments at work?

Yes, you can take your treatments at work. You can take treatments wherever you feel comfortable, as long as you can stay still and keep the I-neb AAD at a 90-degree angle. You may find it useful to speak with your supervisor and/or coworkers beforehand to explain your treatments.

Can I be flexible and take VENTAVIS whenever I want?

You can be flexible and decide when and where you take your treatments each day, but you should always take VENTAVIS exactly as prescribed by your doctor. For example, if your doctor prescribed VENTAVIS 6 times a day, take it once when you wake up, once before going to bed, and at 4 other times throughout the day. You do not need to take VENTAVIS at the same time, so you have flexibility to fit VENTAVIS into your schedule as it changes. Make sure that your treatment sessions are spaced at least 2 hours apart.

What happens if I miss a treatment?

If you happen to miss a dose, you don't need to be worried. Simply take a treatment as soon as you're able to, or continue with your regular dosing schedule and take your next planned treatment. Make sure that you don't take VENTAVIS more than once every 2 hours. If you end up taking less than the number of treatments your doctor has asked that you take, go back to the prescribed amount the next day.

Do you have an example of how I would take VENTAVIS 6 times a day?

Develop a schedule that works best for you. Many patients who take VENTAVIS 6 times a day take a treatment first thing when they get up in the morning and before they go to bed, fitting in the 4 other times during the day (one before and after lunch and one before and after dinner). Here's an example that might help. Always ask your doctor what is the right dosing for you.

  Taking VENTAVIS Each Day: An Example  
  Dose When  
  1 First thing in the morning  
  2 Mid-morning  
  3 After lunch  
  4 Before dinner  
  5 After dinner  
  6 At least 2 hours following your after-dinner session  

Always ask your doctor what is the right dosing for you.


What if I get too tired to finish my treatment?

You can rest during your treatments. When you take your next treatment try taking a rest after the first 3 minutes for about 30 seconds. Then start breathing on the I-neb AAD System again. You can repeat this until you complete the treatment. Also, when you breathe out, don't push the air out, just relax and let your out-breath happen naturally.

If you experience treatment times longer than 4 to 10 minutes, you should notify your doctor to discuss options to shorten your treatment times. Your doctor may prescribe VENTAVIS 20 mcg/mL if you have long treatment times and are maintained at the 5 mcg dose. The higher concentration of medicine lowers the amount of solution you need to take by 50%, which gives you shorter treatment time.1

What should I do if my treatment times get too long?

If you experience treatment times longer than 4 to 10 minutes, you should notify your doctor to discuss options to shorten your treatment times. Learning about the ABCs of VENTAVIS (Angle, Breathing, and Cleaning) can help you manage your treatment times to keep them as short as possible. Because VENTAVIS is only delivered when you breathe in, you can shorten your treatment times by taking longer breaths. Try counting one-one thousand, two-one thousand, three-one thousand each time you breathe in. Your doctor also has access to tools that can show you how to take longer breaths.

The I-neb AAD can deliver VENTAVIS fastest when it's held level. Hold the I-neb AAD at a 90-degree angle to your mouth, like you would when eating a sandwich. You can also rest your elbows on the table while holding your I-neb AAD to make it easier.

Your doctor may prescribe VENTAVIS 20 mcg/mL if you have long treatment times and are maintained at the 5 mcg dose. The higher concentration of medicine lowers the amount of solution you need to take by 50%, which gives you shorter treatment time.1

Do I need to take VENTAVIS at night?

Most patients do not usually take VENTAVIS at night. During the AIR-1 clinical study for VENTAVIS, around 90% of patients slept through the night without taking VENTAVIS. This means you can receive the benefits of VENTAVIS without waking up at night to take any doses. Some patients may choose to take a dose when they wake up at night. You should talk to your doctor to discuss your specific treatment schedule and what works best for you.

Can I take VENTAVIS while wearing my oxygen?

Yes, you can take VENTAVIS and continue to wear your oxygen in your nose. Speak with your doctor about the proper oxygen setting you should use while taking your VENTAVIS treatment.

The path ahead

Where can I go if I have other questions?

An Actelion Pathways Case Manager will be glad to help you with questions about your VENTAVIS therapy—whether it's now when you're first starting up, or if you have questions later on during therapy. Actelion Pathways, Actelion's service and support program, gives you a single point of contact for access to VENTAVIS, reimbursement support, information about financial assistance programs, and information about taking VENTAVIS. To learn more, please call 1-866-ACTELION (1-866-228-3546) or visit Actelion Pathways.

What is VENTAVIS?

VENTAVIS® (iloprost) Inhalation Solution is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with certain kinds of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a condition in which blood pressure is too high in the blood vessels between the heart and the lungs. VENTAVIS may improve your ability to exercise and your symptoms for a short time by lowering your blood pressure and opening up the blood vessels in your lungs.

The study showing VENTAVIS is effective included mainly patients with NYHA Functional Class III-IV PAH. In these patients, PAH was caused by unidentified or hereditary factors (65%) or connective tissue diseases (23%).

VENTAVIS has not been studied in children younger than 18 years old.

What should I tell my doctor before taking VENTAVIS?

VENTAVIS may not be right for you. Before taking VENTAVIS, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have liver or kidney problems. Your doctor may need to give you a lower dose of VENTAVIS.
  • are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if VENTAVIS can harm your unborn baby. VENTAVIS should only be used during pregnancy if the benefit to you is worth the possible risk to your baby.
  • are breast-feeding. It is not known if VENTAVIS passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take VENTAVIS or breast feed.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

VENTAVIS and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. VENTAVIS may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how VENTAVIS works.

Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • medicines used to treat high blood pressure or heart problems
  • medicines that lessen blood clotting (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven)

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines and show it to your doctor and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

How should I take VENTAVIS?

  • Take VENTAVIS exactly as your doctor tells you to take it. Your doctor may change your dose if needed.
  • You should not take VENTAVIS more than every 2 hours. The benefits of VENTAVIS may not last 2 hours, so you may adjust the times that you use it to cover planned activities.
  • Do not drink VENTAVIS.
  • Do not let VENTAVIS solution come into contact with your skin or eyes. If it does, rinse your skin or eyes with water right away.
  • Do not allow other people to be exposed to VENTAVIS while you are breathing it, especially babies and pregnant women.
  • If you take too much VENTAVIS, you may have a headache, red face, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If this happens stop taking VENTAVIS. If your symptoms do not go away, call your doctor or get emergency help right away.

What are the possible side effects of VENTAVIS?

VENTAVIS may cause side effects, including feeling dizzy, lightheaded and faint. If you have any of these side effects, you should stand up slowly when you get out of chairs or bed. Tell your doctor if your fainting gets worse during treatment with VENTAVIS. Your doctor may need to change your dose or your treatment.

Do not drive a car or operate any tools or machines if dizziness or fainting from low blood pressure is a problem for you.

You may have trouble breathing after taking VENTAVIS because it may cause the muscles around your airway to tighten (bronchospasm). Get emergency help right away if you have trouble breathing.

Other important side effects of VENTAVIS include:

  • bleeding
  • red face (flushing)
  • increased cough
  • low blood pressure
  • headaches
  • nausea
  • spasm of your jaw muscles that makes it hard to open your mouth

Talk to your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of VENTAVIS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

What is VENTAVIS?

VENTAVIS® (iloprost) Inhalation Solution is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with certain kinds of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a condition in which blood pressure is too high in the blood vessels between the heart and the lungs. VENTAVIS may improve your ability to exercise and your symptoms for a short time by lowering your blood pressure and opening up the blood vessels in your lungs.

The study showing VENTAVIS is effective included mainly patients with NYHA Functional Class III-IV PAH. In these patients, PAH was caused by unidentified or hereditary factors (65%) or connective tissue diseases (23%).

VENTAVIS has not been studied in children younger than 18 years old.

What should I tell my doctor before taking VENTAVIS?

VENTAVIS may not be right for you. Before taking VENTAVIS, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have liver or kidney problems. Your doctor may need to give you a lower dose of VENTAVIS.
  • are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if VENTAVIS can harm your unborn baby. VENTAVIS should only be used during pregnancy if the benefit to you is worth the possible risk to your baby.
  • are breast-feeding. It is not known if VENTAVIS passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take VENTAVIS or breast feed.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

VENTAVIS and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. VENTAVIS may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how VENTAVIS works.

Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • medicines used to treat high blood pressure or heart problems
  • medicines that lessen blood clotting (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven)

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines and show it to your doctor and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

How should I take VENTAVIS?

  • Take VENTAVIS exactly as your doctor tells you to take it. Your doctor may change your dose if needed.
  • You should not take VENTAVIS more than every 2 hours. The benefits of VENTAVIS may not last 2 hours, so you may adjust the times that you use it to cover planned activities.
  • Do not drink VENTAVIS.
  • Do not let VENTAVIS solution come into contact with your skin or eyes. If it does, rinse your skin or eyes with water right away.
  • Do not allow other people to be exposed to VENTAVIS while you are breathing it, especially babies and pregnant women.
  • If you take too much VENTAVIS, you may have a headache, red face, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If this happens stop taking VENTAVIS. If your symptoms do not go away, call your doctor or get emergency help right away.

What are the possible side effects of VENTAVIS?

VENTAVIS may cause side effects, including feeling dizzy, lightheaded and faint. If you have any of these side effects, you should stand up slowly when you get out of chairs or bed. Tell your doctor if your fainting gets worse during treatment with VENTAVIS. Your doctor may need to change your dose or your treatment.

Do not drive a car or operate any tools or machines if dizziness or fainting from low blood pressure is a problem for you.

You may have trouble breathing after taking VENTAVIS because it may cause the muscles around your airway to tighten (bronchospasm). Get emergency help right away if you have trouble breathing.

Other important side effects of VENTAVIS include:

  • bleeding
  • red face (flushing)
  • increased cough
  • low blood pressure
  • headaches
  • nausea
  • spasm of your jaw muscles that makes it hard to open your mouth

Talk to your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of VENTAVIS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see full Prescribing Information.